The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)


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Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, Edited by D. Josephus and Maccabees: Redecorating the Narrative. Weaving Allusions and Intertextuality into 1 Peter. Banquets at Qumran: Inventing Traditions. Reading the Hippocratic Oath as a Religious Document. Was Adam a Monotheist?

The Old Testament Witness to Christ and His Kingdom, Student Workbook: Capstone Module 9, English

Synagogues in the Days of Jesus and Paul. John Philoponus and the Rejection of Aristotelian Science. The Case of Book of Mormon Lands. Tabitha and Peter. Acts Cornelius, Peter, and the Conversion of the Gentiles. Israel and Her Ancient Neighboring Civilizations. The Baptism of Jesus by John the Baptist.

Gospel of The Kingdom

Mark 1; Matthew 3; Luke 3; John 1. Deborah and Barak versus Jabin and Sisera. Judges 4. The Transfiguration of Jesus. Mark 9; Matthew 17; Luke 9. Warfare and Defense in the Ancient World. Byzantine Christianity and Jerusalem. Mark 14; Matthew 26; Luke 22; John The Burial of Jesus.

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Mark 15; Matthew 27; Luke 23; John The Resurrection of Jesus. Mark 16; Matthew 28; Luke 24; John The Condemnation of Jesus. The Flagellation of Jesus. Mark Church of the Flagellation, Jerusalem, Israel , Holy Places Past and Present. Mount of Olives and the Last Days. Column 2 — Sign: This column lists the modern "square" forms of the twenty-two letters that began to replace the ancient script Column 5 around sixth century BC. Note that five letters have two forms. The form listed on the left shows how the letter is drawn when it appears at the end of a word.

The form on the right is for all other cases. Column 3 — Name: The names of the letters are related to their shapes in the old Hebrew script. For example, the meaning of Aleph as ox was denoted by drawing an ox head with horns:. When rotated, it became the Latin A. Likewise Bet began as a picture of a tent — — the typical house of desert dwelling folk.

When rotated, it became the lowercase Latin b. In most cases, there is a direct correspondence between both the form and the sequence of the Latin letters with those in the old Hebrew script. The grey boxes mark the four exceptions. The pronunciations are also very similar. This is why the Hebrew Alphabet is so easy to learn. Column 4 — Literal Meaning: The names of the letters are based on common Hebrew words, as discussed above. Column 5 — Ancient Script: The original forms of the letters in the ancient Hebrew script were more or less obvious pictographs of the thing indicated by the name.

Column 6 — Latin: The correspondence between the Latin and Hebrew Alphabets shows their common origin, and makes learning Hebrew somewhat simpler.

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Column 7 — Pronunciation: The guide is simplified, but should suffice for our purposes. There is one letter of special interest that we should look at before finishing this introduction. The name of the Last letter Tav denotes a mark, sign, or cross. It is the origin of the Latin T and Greek Tau and was drawn in the old script either as and , the latter being identical to the traditional form of the traditional cross of Christ. I first learned this in when I began teaching myself Hebrew from Ben-Yehuda's Pocket Hebrew Dictionary which displays an image of both the modern and ancient forms at the head of each section.

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The digital image above shows the heading for the last letter Tav. This "coincidence" astounded me. The Hebrew Alphabet ends with the sign of the cross in precise analogy with the Gospel Message that declares Christ completed His Work of redemption on His Cross with the words "It is finished" John This was one of the first signs that God used to awaken my interest in the Hebrew Alphabet.


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It was this, along with a number of other "coincidences," that prompted me to delve into a deep study of the symbolic meanings of the twenty-two letters. In , as I sought to systematize my four years of study using the ancient Jewish tradition that says God "placed the letters in a circle," it occurred to me that the whole body of Scripture could be rolled up and integrated with the Hebrew Alphabetic Circle.

This is how God led me to discover the Bible Wheel. For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways, saith the LORD. For as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways, and my thoughts than your thoughts.

On May 12, , I completed the first draft of the of the Bible Wheel shown below. I placed the Hebrew letters on the outer rim so there would be room to write their names in English, and wrote the numerical position of each book below its name for easy reference. Each Cycle spans a continuous sequence of twenty-two books:. With the completion of the Bible Wheel, we now have a fully unified view of the whole Bible as a symmetrical, mathematically structured two-dimensional object.

The increase from the traditional one-dimensional list of books to the two-dimensional Bible Wheel immediately reveals a host of unanticipated correlations between the three books on each Spoke with each other and the corresponding Hebrew letter. The correlations exhibit a perfection of intelligence unlike anything ever seen in the history of the world. They involve top-level super-obvious patterns based on fundamental Biblical categories, historical events, specific content from the Alphabetic Verses found only on the corresponding Spoke, and so on and so forth.

First amongst the "host of unanticipated correlations" is the alignment of Genesis, Isaiah, and Romans on the first Spoke. These are the first books of three primary divisions of Scripture:. The conjunction of the "Law" and the "Prophets" immediately evokes the self-desciption of Scripture found within Scripture and we see that the text of Scripture describes the its own large-scale structure! These three "first books" align with the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet, Aleph, which is a Biblical symbol of beginnings or first things.

We have, therefore, a top-level super-obvious integration of the structure of Scripture with the meaning of the first letter of the Hebrew alphabet as defined within the Holy Text itself. To fully appreciate the significance of this "coincidence" we need to review the large-scale structure of the Christian Canon. But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me, and I unto the world.

For in Christ Jesus neither circumcision availeth any thing, nor uncircumcision, but a new creature. And as many as walk according to this rule, peace be on them, and mercy, and upon the Israel of God. Paul used this word above in Galatians and again in Philippians when he admonished us to "walk according to the same rule kanon.

It is of primary importance to remember that the Bible Wheel is a representation of the Protestant Bible. Issues relating to such things as other versions of the Bible and the Apocrypha, while interesting, do not impact any facts presented in this book. The Protestant Canon possesses an extraordinarily coherent and perfectly symmetric structure.

It is first divided into two main groups:.

[Wheel] > The Divine Seal and Capstone of God's Word

These two groups further subdivide into seven divisions based primarily on the genre, or type of writing, of each Book. This has been thoroughly studied and documented in many Biblical commentaries. My favorite is J. Sidlow Baxter's massive six-volume Explore the Book in which he presented a detailed analysis of the main themes of each of the sixty-six books in the context of the "big picture" of the whole Bible. His work shines with a rare brilliance, being thoroughly enlightened by his full appreciation of the Divine design of the Holy Bible, as is quite evident from the introduction to his book:.

Our Bible consists of sixty-six component parts. These are divided into two distinctive major collections, the Old and New Testaments.


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But each of these two Testaments, the one consisting of thirty-nine books, the other of twenty-seven, is found to be arranged in certain clearly homogenous groups; and in this connection careful investigation reveals the presence of a marvelous Divine design running through the whole.

This presence of plan and design does not only pertain to the Bible in this general sense; it runs through all the different book-groups considered separately; and the more we follow it through in detail, so the more won-derful it becomes, until all possibility of its being mere coincidence is eliminated by over-whelming abundance of evidence that this is indeed the word of the living God. Baxter was not alone with this insight. Graham Scroggie held an identical view which he described in the introduction to his magnificent synthetic vision of the Bible as whole, The Unfolding Drama of Redemption :.

In the Bible, as in biology, the whole is more than the aggregate of the parts. A living body is more than an assemblage of limbs; and the Bible is more than a collection of texts, paragraphs, chapters, or even books; it is a spiritual organism, in which each part is related to, and is dependent on, every other part, the whole being pervaded by spiritual life.

The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum) The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)
The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum) The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)
The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum) The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)
The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum) The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)
The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum) The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)
The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum) The New Testament Witness to Christ & His Kingdom, Module 13 (The Capstone Curriculum)

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